HIV treatment programmes lose their impact if they do not help people engage with medical care after an HIV diagnosis and stay in contact with HIV services. Improving retention and linkage to care is crucial to improving outcomes along the HIV treatment cascade.

Retention and linkage to care: latest news

Retention and linkage to care resources

Retention and linkage to care features

Retention and linkage to care news from aidsmap

More news

Retention and linkage to care news selected from other sources

  • Community based adherence clubs have higher drop-out rates than those based in clinics

    Differentiated care models need further investigation to support people living with HIV with taking their antiretroviral treatment (ART).

    07 June 2019 | Avert
  • I Moved Back to Atlanta from Boston, and I've Been Out of HIV Meds for a Month

    HIV care is separate and unequal in America, health activist Mason writes, as "the system of care here feels no urgency around my survival."

    04 June 2019 | The Body
  • Cash Incentives, Peer Support May Not Incentivize HCV Treatment

    A randomized trial comparing a cash incentive to peer support for increasing acceptance of treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) among persons with HCV/HIV coinfection, including those who use drugs or alcohol, found both methods helpful but that 1 in 4 patients still declined treatment.

    10 May 2019 | MD Magazine
  • Confidentiality breaches, stigma and a lack of time are stopping men in Côte d’Ivoire from getting tested and treated for HIV

    Interviews with men in Côte d’Ivoire reveal radical differences in the perceptions of those who do and don’t access care. Research, published in PLOS ONE, found many of the worries of men out of care are not reflected in the experiences of those with regular contact with services. Men’s perceptions were linked with their level of engagement with HIV care, with men who have regular contact with HIV testing and treatment services displaying more positive attitudes than those with little or no contact with such services. The paper can be seen at https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0211385

    24 April 2019 | AVERT
  • Cote d'Ivoire: Privacy concerns keep men from HIV testing, treatment

    Privacy concerns linked to both health facilities and providers are major barriers to increasing the number of men who are tested and treated for HIV in Cote d'Ivoire, suggests new Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) research. CCP is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

    26 March 2019 | Eurekalert Medicine & Health
  • US: 80% of new HIV cases transmitted by undiagnosed or untreated people

    In 2016, more than 80% of new HIV infections in the United States were transmitted by individuals who either did not know they were infected with HIV or had been diagnosed but were not receiving care, according to data released on the first day of the National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.

    19 March 2019 | Healio
  • Trump’s Proposed Budget Undermines His H.I.V. Plan, Experts Say

    Strategies abound to end the AIDS epidemic, but expense — mostly for drugs costing up to $50,000 a year — is the inevitable obstacle.

    14 March 2019 | The New York Times
  • South Africa: The problem of stopping or not starting HIV treatment

    South Africa has the largest HIV epidemic in the world. The United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimates that there are approximately 7.2-million South Africans living with HIV, with 270 000 new HIV infections in 2017. South Africa also has the largest antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme with more than four million people estimated to be on treatment. Despite progress in getting people onto treatment, recent evidence indicates that the country is still experiencing significant numbers of people developing and dying from advanced HIV-disease. This is as result of people who either do not start treatment, start treatment late, or stop and re-start treatment. There is, therefore, an urgent need to not only prioritise HIV-testing but to ensure that once people start treatment, they remain on life-long care.

    12 March 2019 | Spotlight
  • India’s first LGBTQ clinic and HIV treatment centre inaugurated in Mumbai

    Based out of the Humsafar Trust’s office jn Mumbai, the centre will give free counselling and provide Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) to the LGBTQ community. TAshok Row Kavi, founder chairperson of the Trust, said: “Until now we would get testing done for the community members at our centre. If tested positive for the disease, they would be asked to go to Sion Hospital, but there was a huge dropout (rate) there. Because of how the community is perceived outside, a lot of these people wouldn’t seek treatment."

    12 March 2019 | Hindustan Times
  • Researchers Report High Rate of Viral Suppression Among People New to HIV Care

    Eighty-six percent of individuals who entered HIV care soon after diagnosis maintained viral suppression after 48 weeks during a clinical trial conducted at four National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs) across the United States. Participants in the clinical trial, called iENGAGE, achieved viral suppression in an average of just 63 days. The findings were presented in a poster at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (link is external) (CROI 2019) in Seattle.

    08 March 2019 | NIAID
More news

Our information levels explained

  • Short and simple introductions to key HIV topics, sometimes illustrated with pictures.
  • Expands on the previous level, but also written in easy-to-understand plain language.
  • More detailed information, likely to include medical and scientific language.
  • Detailed, comprehensive information, using medical and specialised language.
Community Consensus Statement on Access to HIV Treatment and its Use for Prevention

Together, we can make it happen

We can end HIV soon if people have equal access to HIV drugs as treatment and as PrEP, and have free choice over whether to take them.

Launched today, the Community Consensus Statement is a basic set of principles aimed at making sure that happens.

The Community Consensus Statement is a joint initiative of AVAC, EATG, MSMGF, GNP+, HIV i-Base, the International HIV/AIDS Alliance, ITPC and NAM/aidsmap
close

This content was checked for accuracy at the time it was written. It may have been superseded by more recent developments. NAM recommends checking whether this is the most current information when making decisions that may affect your health.

NAM’s information is intended to support, rather than replace, consultation with a healthcare professional. Talk to your doctor or another member of your healthcare team for advice tailored to your situation.